Our Blog

Posts for: December, 2018

By Thomas J. English, DDS
December 27, 2018
Category: Oral Health
4ProblemAreasThatCouldAffectYourChildsTeeth

While they're resilient, your child's teeth aren't invincible. Daily hygiene and regular dental visits are important, but you should also be alert for problems and take action when they arise.

Here are 4 areas that could cause problems for your child's teeth, and what you should do — or not do — if you encounter them.

Teething. This is a normal experience as your child's first teeth erupt through the gums. The gums become tender and painful, causing constant gnawing, drooling, disturbed sleep and similar symptoms. You can help relieve discomfort by letting them bite on a chilled (not frozen) teething ring or a cold, wet washcloth. Pain relievers like ibuprofen in appropriate dosages can also help — but don't apply ice, alcohol or numbing agents containing Benzocaine directly to the gums.

Toothache. Tooth pain could be a sign of decay, so you should see us for an examination. In the meantime you can help relieve pain with a warm-water rinse, a cold compress to the outside of the face, or appropriately-dosed pain relievers. If the pain is intense or persists overnight, see us no later than the next day if possible.

Swollen or bleeding gums. If you notice your child's gums are red and swollen or easily bleed during brushing, they could have periodontal (gum) disease. This is an infection caused by bacterial plaque, a thin film of food particles that build up on the teeth. You can stop plaque buildup by helping them practice effective, daily brushing and flossing. If they're showing symptoms, though, see us for an exam. In the meantime, be sure they continue to gently brush their teeth, even if their gums are irritated.

Chipped, cracked or knocked out tooth. If your child's teeth are injured, you should see us immediately. If part of the tooth has broken off, try to retrieve the broken pieces and bring them with you. If it's a permanent tooth that was knocked out, pick it up by the crown (not the root), rinse it with clean water and attempt to place it back in the socket. If you can't, bring the tooth with you in a container with clean water or milk. The sooner you see us, the better the chances for saving the tooth — minutes count.

If you would like more information on what to do when your child has dental problems, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Thomas J. English, DDS
December 17, 2018
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: oral hygiene  
WhatYouNeedtoKnowtoBuytheRightToothbrush

If there’s one essential tool for protecting your dental health, it’s the humble toothbrush. The basic manual brush with a long, slender handle and short-bristled head is still effective when used skillfully. The market, though, is full of choices, all of them touting their brand as the best.

So how do you choose? You can cut through any marketing hype with a few simple guidelines.

First, understand what you’re trying to accomplish with brushing: removing dental plaque, that thin film of bacteria and food particles on tooth surfaces that’s the main cause of dental disease. Brushing also stimulates gum tissue and helps reduce inflammation.

With that in mind, you’ll first want to consider the texture of a toothbrush’s bristles, whether they’re stiff (hard) or more pliable (soft). You might think the firmer the better for removing plaque, but actually a soft-bristled brush is just as effective in this regard. Stiffer bristles could also damage the gums over the long term.

Speaking of bristles, look for those that have rounded tips. In a 2016 study, less rounded tips increased gum recession in the study’s participants by 30%. You should also look for toothbrushes with different bristle heights: longer bristles at the end can be more effective cleaning back teeth.

As far as size and shape, choose a brush that seems right and comfortable for you when you hold it. For children or people with dexterity problems, a handle with a large grip area can make the toothbrush easier to hold and use.

And look for the American Dental Association (ADA) Seal of Acceptance, something you may have seen on some toothpaste brands. It means the toothbrush in question has undergone independent testing and meets the ADA’s standards for effectiveness. That doesn’t mean a particular brush without the seal is sub-standard—when in doubt ask your dentist on their recommendation.

Even a quality toothbrush is only as effective as your skill in using it. Your dental provider can help, giving you tips and training for getting the most out of your brush. With practice, you and your toothbrush can effectively remove disease-causing plaque and help keep your smile beautiful and healthy.

If you would like more information on what to look for in a toothbrush, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sizing up Toothbrushes.”


By THOMAS J. ENGLISH, DDS
December 11, 2018
Category: Orthodontics
Tags: braces   orthodontics  

Discover the benefits your smile will enjoy when you get braces.

When most people think about getting braces the main reason has to do with straightening a misaligned or crooked smile, also known as aorthodontic care malocclusion (“bad bite”). After all, nothing makes you feel more confident than being able to flash a perfectly straight smile. Of course, people often don’t realize that orthodontic treatment and a straighter smile can afford other benefits to their oral health, as well. From the office of Conroe, TX, dentist Dr. Thomas English, here are some of the lesser-known benefits of getting braces.

Decreased Risk for Decay and Gum Disease
When your teeth are straight there are fewer areas where cavity-producing bacteria can get trapped. Misaligned smiles that are left untreated are more likely to harbor plaque buildup and food, as there are more areas for them to get stuck. Before long plaque buildup leads to cavities and gum disease.

Reduced Risk for TMJ Disorder, Jaw Problems and Dental Injuries
Another way braces can improve oral health is by improving tooth function. The upper and lower rows of teeth do not line up properly when the bite is misaligned. Underbites and overbites are examples of misaligned bites. In such cases, the work of biting and chewing is not always evenly distributed across teeth when they are not properly aligned. Uneven distribution can lead to additional strain on certain teeth. Those teeth can sustain extra wear and tear, which can adversely affect oral health. If you do not fix this issue more stress is placed on the jaws, which can lead to joint pain and problems such as TMJ disorder, as well as excessive wear and tear on certain teeth. Over time, this wear and tear can lead to fractures or cracks in teeth.

Types of Braces
Several options are available when it comes to braces. Whatever type of braces you select, you will benefit by straightening your smile, correcting your bite, and improving oral health. Four main types of braces include traditional metal, clear ceramic, clear aligner therapy, and lingual. The brackets for metal and ceramic braces are placed on the front of the teeth, while they are discreetly placed on the back with lingual braces. The clear aligner therapy such as Invisalign is a popular choice by many since it doesn't involve brackets or wires. Your Conroe dentist can help you select the right type of braces for you.

There are several benefits to getting braces. Beyond achieving straight teeth and a corrected bite, you will also improve tooth functioning and make oral hygiene easier. Both of these benefits can improve your oral health. To learn more about how braces can improve your oral health, schedule a consultation with Conroe, TX, dentist Dr. Thomas English.


3ThingsYouMightNoticewithYourChildsTeethThatNeedaDentist

Dental disease doesn’t discriminate by age. Although certain types of disease are more common in adults, children are just as susceptible, particularly to tooth decay.

Unfortunately, the early signs of disease in a child’s teeth can be quite subtle—that’s why you as a parent should keep alert for any signs of a problem. Here are 3 things you might notice that definitely need your dentist’s attention.

Cavities. Tooth decay occurs when mouth acid erodes tooth enamel and forms holes or cavities. The infection can continue to grow and affect deeper parts of the tooth like the pulp and root canals, eventually endangering the tooth’s survival. If you notice tiny brown spots on their teeth, this may indicate the presence of cavities—you should see your dentist as soon as possible. To account for what you don’t see, have your child visit your dentist at least twice a year for cleanings and checkups.

Toothache. Tooth pain can range from a sensitive twinge of pain when eating or drinking hot or cold foods to a throbbing sharp pain. Whatever its form, a child’s toothache might indicate advancing decay in which the infection has entered the tooth pulp and is attacking the nerves. If your child experiences any form of toothache, see your dentist the next day if possible. Even if the pain goes away, don’t cancel the appointment—it’s probable the infection is still there and growing.

Bleeding gums. Gums don’t normally bleed during teeth brushing—the gums are much more resilient unless they’ve been weakened by periodontal (gum) disease (although over-aggressive brushing could also be a cause). ┬áIf you notice your child’s gums bleeding after brushing, see your dentist as soon as possible—the sooner they receive treatment for any gum problems the less damage they’ll experience, and the better chance of preserving any affected teeth.

If you would like more information on dental care for your child, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.